Recently in the Aerojet Rocketdyne Category


Aerojet Rocketdyne's new dual-mode ramjet/scramjet undergoes testing in the 8-foot high temperature tunnel at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia

Aerojet Rocketdyne's advanced tactical booster program recently completed two successful hot-fire tests of a motor that had been conditioned to mimic extreme cold- and hot-soak conditions for air-launch application.

Aerojet Rocketdyne successfully fired its AR-22 booster rocket engine an unprecedented 10 times in 240 hours at NASA Stennis Space Center, demonstrating the feasibility of rapidly recycling the engine to enable a reusable launch vehicle capable of high-tempo, aircraft-like flight operations.

Aerojet Rocketdyne recently passed a key milestone in preparation for the Ascent Abort Test (AA-2) next year with the successful casting of the Jettison Motor for the Lockheed Martin-built Orion spacecraft's Launch Abort System (LAS).

Aerojet Rocketdyne recently achieved a significant milestone by successfully completing a series of hot-fire tests of an advanced, next-generation RL10 engine thrust chamber design that was built almost entirely using additive manufacturing; commonly known as 3-D printing.

Aerojet Rocketdyne successfully completed hot-fire testing of a new in-space engine, designated ISE-100.

Aerojet Rocketdyne recently completed delivery of all of the crew module engines for Boeing's Crew Space Transportation (CST)-100 Starliner spacecraft.

Aerojet Rocketdyne, a subsidiary of Aerojet Rocketdyne Holdings, Inc. announces the four RS-25 engines slated to fly on Exploration Mission-1 (EM-1), the maiden flight of NASA's Space Launch System (SLS), are ready for integration with the rocket's core stage.

Aerojet Rocketdyne, a subsidiary of Aerojet Rocketdyne Holdings, Inc., successfully tested its third RS-25 engine flight controller today at NASA's Stennis Space Center in Mississippi.

Aerojet Rocketdyne, a subsidiary of Aerojet Rocketdyne Holdings, Inc., recently completed a series of hot-fire tests on a 30,000 lbf thrust-class Bantam liquid-fueled rocket engine built with additive manufacturing, also known as 3-D printing.